The path to a heart

No human relation gives one possession in another – every two souls are absolutely different. In friendship or in love, the two side by side raise hands together to find what one cannot reach alone.~ Kahlil Gibran’s words from Mary Haskell’s journal (8 June 1924)

When  Carlo gave me “The Prophet” by Kahlil Gibran,  he quoted the above words of Kahlil telling me: “Our relationship is unique. No one  will understand the love we have for one another. We are two different souls walking side by side…” I was 16 then while he is 10 years my senior. Our relationship was purely platonic which lasted for several years till he died.

Do you believe in platonic love between a man and a woman or even between same sex? Carlo conceived platonic love as pure and unconditional. “It’s the feeling that matters, not what you get out of it”,  he said.

Our society scoffs at this kind of relationship. It wonders and suspects if an emotional and intellectual attraction between two persons can survive without sex.

Since that day Carlo introduced me to Kahlil, I found myself  attracted to Gibran’s works and spirituality. I wanted to  know him more as a man.

Reading the verbatim quotes from the journal entries , I discovered a beautiful platonic relationship between Kahlil and Mary which lasted for more than 20 years till his death. The 325 letters which Kahlil  wrote her gave me an insight of his innermost feelings and sensitivity as a man.

Carlo, on your 10th  death anniversary today, I would like to raise my hands in gesture of salute to you as a man, as a treasured friend and as an intellectual lover who walked by my side unconditionally.

Like Kahlil, your  favorite poet and philosopher, I have known an art of love far beyond human judgement. I owe you that Carlo.

I am sharing some of Kahlil Gibran’s letters to tell the world that platonic love between two persons is possible!
 

  • Each and every one of us, dear Mary, must have a resting place somewhere. The resting place of my soul is a beautiful grove where my knowledge of you lives.
    (Extract from one of Gibran’s letters dated 8th November 1908)
  • Let me, O let me bathe my soul in colours; let me swallow the sunset and drink the rainbow.
    (Extract from one of Gibran’s letters dated 8th November 1908)
  • I want to be alive To all the life that is in me now, to know each moment to the uttermost.
    (Gibran’s words quoted from Mary Haskell’s journal dated 7th June 1912)
  • Imagination sees the complete reality, – it is where past, present and future meet… Imagination is limited neither to the reality which is apparent – nor to one place. It lives everywhere. It is at a centre and feels the vibrations of all the circles within which east and west are virtually included. Imagination is the life of mental freedom. It realizes what everything is in its many aspects … Imagination does not uplift: we don’t want to be uplifted, we want to be more completely aware.
    (Gibran’s words quoted from Mary Haskell’s journal dated 7th June 1912)
  • I realized that all the trouble I ever had about you came from some smallness or fear in myself.
    (Extract from Mary Haskell’s journal dated 12th June 1912)
  • Mary, what is there in a storm that moves me so ? Why am I so much better and stronger and more certain of life when a storm is passing ? I do not know, and yet I love a storm more, far more, than anything in nature.
    (Extract from one of Gibran’s letters dated 14th August 1912)
  • The most wonderful thing, Mary, is that you and I are always walking together, hand in hand, in a strangely beautiful world, unknown to other people. We both stretch one hand to receive from Life – and Life is generous indeed.
    (Extract from one of Gibran’s letters dated 22nd October 1912)

(more…)

Khalil Gibran’s message for the Philippines

Are you a politician asking what your country can do for you or a zealous one asking what you can do for your country? If you are the first, then you are a parasite; if it is the second, then you are an oasis in a desert.” – The New Frontier  by Khalil Gibran

This statement appeared in an article written by Gibran in Arabic, over eighty years ago. Yet I find it so contemporary particularly for my country  in its preparation for the coming May 14, 2007  legislative  and local elections.  I am sad and angry by how our  political situation is going on but I am not going to bore you by  writing  about these problems.

I would like to share the full text of Khalil Gibran’s New Frontier as part of my yearning desire to ask each politicians who are governing my country and those who are aspiring to govern or corrupt it; to ask each Filipinos and myself what are we doing for our country and countrymen; and going further,  to ask each world  leaders  to question themselves: what are they doing to this world.

To completely immersed in this article written by one of my favorite writers, you can try to substitute “Middle East” to whatever country you belong to, like in my case: Philippines.

Here it is…

There are in the Middle East today two challenging ideas: old and new. The old ideas will vanish because they are weak and exhausted. There is in the Middle East an awakening that defies slumber. This awakening will conquer because the sun is its leader and the dawn is its army.

In the fields of the Middle East, which have been a large burial ground, stand the youth of Spring calling the occupants of the Sepulchres to rise and march toward the new frontiers. When the Spring sings its hymns the dead of the winter rise, shed their shrouds and march forward.

There is on the horizon of the Middle East a new awakening; it is growing and expanding; it is reaching and engulfing all sensitive, intelligent souls; it is penetrating and gaining all the sympathy of noble hearts.

The Middle East, today, has two masters. One is deciding, ordering, being obeyed; but he is at the point of death. But the other one is silent in his conformity to law and order, calmly awaiting justice; he is a powerful giant who knows his own strength, confident in his existence and a believer in his destiny.

There are today, in the Middle East, two men: one of the past and one of the future. Which one are you? Come close, let me look at you and let me be assured by your appearance and your conduct if you are one of those coming into the light or going into the darkness.

Come and tell me who and what are you.

Are you a politician asking what your country can do for you or a zealous one asking what you can do for your country? If you are the first, then you are a parasite; is the second, then you are an oasis in a desert.

Are you a merchant utilizing the need of society for the necessities of life, for monopoly and exorbitant profit? Or a sincere, hard-working and diligent man facilitating the exchange between the weaver and the farmer? Are you charging a reasonable profit as a middleman between supply and demand? If you are the first, then you are a criminal whether you live in a palace or a prison. If you are the second, then you are a charitable man whether you are thanked or denounced by people.

Are you a religious leader, weaving for your body a gown out of the ignorance of the people, fashioning a crown out of the simplicity of their hearts and pretending to hate the devil merely to live upon his income? Or are you a devout and a pious man who sees in the piety of the individual the foundation for a progressive nation, and who can see through a profound search in the depth of his own soul a ladder to the eternal soul that directs the world? If you are the first, then you are a heretic, a disbeliever in God even if you fast by day and pray by night. If you are the second, then you are a violet in the garden of truth even though its fragrance is lost upon the nostrils of humanity or whether its aroma rises into that rare air where the fragrance of flowers is preserved.

Are you a newspaperman who sells his idea and principle in the slave market, who lives on the misery of people like a buzzard which descends only upon a decaying carcass? Or are you a teacher on the platform of the city gathering experience from life and presenting it to the people as sermons you have learned? If you are the first, then you are a sore and an ulcer. If you are the second, then you are a balsam and a medicine.

Are you a governor who denigrates himself before those who appoint him and denigrates those whom he is to govern, who never raises a hand unless it is to reach into pockets and who does not take a step unless it is for greed? Or are you a faithful servant who serves only the welfare of the people? If you are the first, then you are as a tare in the threshing floor of the nations; and if the second, then you are a blessing upon its granaries.

Are you a husband who allows for himself what he disallows for his wife, living in abandonment with the key of her prison in his boots, gorging himself with his favourite food while she sits, by herself, before an empty dish? Or are you a companion, taking no action except hand in hand, nor doing anything unless she gives her thoughts and opinions, and sharing with her your happiness and success? If you are the first, then you are a remnant of a tribe which, still dressing in the skins of animals, vanished long before leaving the caves; and if you are the second, then you are a leader in a nation moving in the dawn toward the light of justice and wisdom.

Are you a searching writer full of self-admiration, keeping his head in the valley of a dusty past, where the ages discarded the remnant of its clothes and useless ideas? Or are you a clear thinker examining what is good and useful for society and spending your life in building what is useful and destroying what is harmful? If you are the first, then you are feeble and stupid, and if you are the second, then you are bread for the hungry and water for the thirsty.

Are you a poet, who plays the tambourine at the doors of emirs, or the one who throws the flowers during weddings and who walks in processions with a sponge full of warm water in his mouth, a sponge to be pressed by his tongue and lips as soon as he reaches the cemetery? Or have you a gift which God has placed in your hands on which to play heavenly melodies which draw our hearts toward the beautiful in life? If you are the first, then you are a juggler who evokes in our soul that which is contrary to what you intend. If you are the second, then you are love in our hearts and a vision in our minds.

In the Middle East there are two processions: One procession is of old people waling with bent backs, supported with bent canes; they are out of breath though their path is downhill.

The other is a procession of young men, running as if on winged feet, and jubilant as with musical strings in their throats, surmounting obstacles as if there were magnets drawing them up on the mountainside and magic enchanting their hearts.

Which are you and in which procession do you move?

Ask yourself and meditate in the still of the night; find if you are a slave of yesterday or free for the morrow.

I tell you that the children of yesteryears are walking in the funeral of the era that they created for themselves. They are pulling a rotted rope that might break soon and cause them to drop into a forgotten abyss. I say that they are living in homes with weak foundations; as the storm blows — and it is about to blow — their homes will fall upon their heads and thus become their tombs. I say that all their thoughts, their sayings, their quarrels, their compositions, their books and all their work are nothing but chains dragging them because they are too weak to pull the load.

But the children of tomorrow are the ones called by life, and the follow it with steady steps and heads high, they are the dawn of new frontiers, no smoke will veil their eyes and no jingle of chains will drown out their voices. They are few in number, but the difference is as between a grain of wheat and a stack of hay. No one knows them but they know each other. They are like the summits, which can see or hear each other — not like caves, which cannot hear or see. They are the seed dropped by the hand of God in the field, breaking through its pod and waving its sapling leaves before the face of the sun. It shall grow into a mighty tree, its root in the heart of the earth and its branches high in the sky.

The New Frontier, 1925  – K.Gibran

Khalil Gibran

All work is empty save when there is love. When you work with love you bind yourself to yourself, and to one another, and to God.” – Khalil Gibran

My dear Philippines, where are you going now???

My dear Filipinos, tell me who and what are you?? – Rosanna Sarte

Page 22 of 30« First...10...18192021222324252627...Last »